Issue #30

How Many Women at the Tomb, Walk in the Light, Misreading Scripture, and more...

Issue #30
Photo by Paul Green / Unsplash

Bible Study: Hebrews Part 3 (1:1–1:2a) — God Speaks, Do We Listen?→

The letter/sermon to the Hebrews opens, like any good sermon, with a punch. The first four verses are beautifully constructed and designed to capture the hearer’s attention.

1 Long ago God spoke to our ancestors by the prophets at different times and in different ways. 2 In these last days, he has spoken to us by his Son. God has appointed him heir of all things and made the universe, through him. 3 The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact expression of his nature, sustaining all things by his powerful word. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high. 4 So he became superior to the angels, just as the name he inherited is more excellent than theirs.
— Hebrews 1:1–4 (CSB)

The entirety of verses 1–4 is one long sentence in the Greek, and at its heart is “God has spoken to us by a Son.” Everything else in the Greek is a dependent clause. The author’s main point in his introduction to the book of Hebrews is that the Son is God’s greatest act of communication to mankind, and he will spend the rest of the book of Hebrews explaining that point and all its implications.

Today we’re going to cut this sentence in half and look at the first half of this introduction in verses 1-2a.

1 Long ago God spoke to our ancestors by the prophets at different times and in different ways. 2 In these last days, he has spoken to us by his Son.

Three comparisons dominate, all centered around God’s speaking...

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How Many Women Went to the Tomb - Supposed Bible Contradiction #23 | Inspiring Philosophy (Michael Jones) 📽 →

Skeptics love to bring up the claim the gospels contradict because they all mention a different number of women who went to the tomb. But exploring the cultural context can help address this objection.

This is a challenge that I’ve heard more than perhaps any other, and on its face, it’s a clear contradiction. Once you understand the conventions of the time and how the Gospel authors wrote, however, it really is quite simple to understand.

There’s no contradiction here. In fact, as Jones says, the “contradiction” probably shows how the Gospel authors were careful in not overstepping their knowledge and sources.

It’s not a long video, and it will do more than just show you how to resolve a commonly raised “contradiction” in scripture. It will teach you how to understand the four similar but different pictures of events we have in the four Gospels.

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